About your Search

20121203
20121203
STATION
SFGTV2 13
FBC 9
CNBC 6
MSNBCW 6
SFGTV 5
CSPAN2 4
CNNW 3
KTVU (FOX) 3
CSPAN 2
KPIX (CBS) 1
KQED (PBS) 1
KRON (MyNetworkTV) 1
LANGUAGE
English 61
Search Results 0 to 49 of about 61 (some duplicates have been removed)
an environment that will be welcoming of the new economy, technology, and innovation to reinforce what we have been saying. we are the innovation capital of the world. with your help and involvement. we would like to have the rest of the city picked up and be part of it as well. we think we can have that conversation. we will need your help. we will need you to represent the new industry. these companies are here to keep the dialogue and collaboration at a high-level going with us. it is the ongoing dialogue like the one we are reading about a new tax structure for the city that does not punish the inventiveness we want to have. i would like to open with that introduction, welcome all of you here. i think he will see and hear an exciting introduction of these new companies. they're going to raise questions we do not have the answers to yet, but i do believe we have the spirit in this city to welcome solutions with your involvement. we will have the ability to do this on line as well is in these forums. i will be part of the ongoing discussion. i want to see all of you interact with the city an
,000 gallons a day. it is the beginning of understanding and feeling comfortable with this technology that can be scaled up into eco districts and community scale systems, campus-type systems where in those situations when the water is reused and the numbers are much higher, 50,000, 100,000, 200,000 gallons a day, imagine the savings on that that you're getting. you're not purchasing freshwater and you're not using the sewer and being charged appropriately. this wastewater processing and reuse technology is cutting edge. and although it's been successfully implemented in other cities, it will be one of the first such installations in an urban office building. >> here is a city agency that treats wastewater, but they send no wastewater to the treatment facility. that says a lot. >> it's got a 12 gallon per day occupancy using 5,000 gallons per day with a building officing 1,000 people. that turns out to save over 2.7 million gallons a year. >> the public utilities commission runs water, power and sewer services for san francisco. we can't afford to be out of business after an earthquake. so, we
technologies, often by a robot... or personally by a technician on a bicycle. sensors detect breaks, cracks, and weaknesses in the pipe. man: we have roots at this cap lateral at 79. narrator: tree roots can grow into the pipe, splitting it apart. man: more light roots at 69. narrator: sometimes they may even find fully collapsed sections. after gathering the data, utilities can assess the need for rehabilitation. sinha: you have to choose the rehabilitation technique so that the life of the pipe can be extended 30 years, 40 years, 50 years. allbee: any asset has an optimal investment strategy. if you're making investments in that asset too early, or too late, you're wasting money. it costs about three times as much to fix a system once it's failed. so it's all about finding that right point where the dollars should flow toward that asset. narrator: but finding the funds to evaluate and rebuild these assets is an ongoing struggle. johnson: there is a gap between what's being spent by municipalities and water supply systems and what needs to be spent. and somehow that has to be made up. so t
they talk about the brain? >> the wlau of accelerated returns is the information technology, which includes computers and communications and biological technologies but including understanding our brains is progressing expo tentally. doubl doubling in power every year. we can see inside a living brain with exquisite precision and see your thoughts kraetd your brain. that's part of the secret of human thinking. the recognition of theory of mane is the neokcortex, is base on recognizing patterns. by my account, some do simple jobs like there's a crust part in a capital a. some do high level jobs like she's pretty or that's funny. those recognizers are the same, but they exist at a different level of this grand hierarchy. that's the key to the neocortex. it's organized in a hierarchical fashion. we create that hierarchy ourselves from the moment we're born or even earlier. >> you know, i've read with some interest about the steps you've taken to sort of do what's called a similarity with machine intelligence and human intelligence is equality or maybe it will overlap a little bit. what if you
these technologies established engineering concepts that are still the basis for our water systems today. europeans flocked here. it was a destination point to see the new world technology. when charles dickens visited us in 1840, he was truly blown away by high water pressure on the fourth floor of the hotel he was staying in. nowhere in europe had he experienced that. this technology was doing something to support the life and the growth of the city. philadelphia, throughout the 19th century, was the major industrial city of the united states. all of these industries used water from this system. and it served as a prototype for many american cities, including pittsburgh and new york. man: new york city went to philadelphia and said, "you know, we're thinking of developing a hudson river water supply -- what do you suggest we do?" and they said, "we've had "a lot of problems on the schuylkill. "don't go to the hudson river. go to the upland and work by gravity." and that's what new york city did. they first went to the hudson highlands, but 150 years later, it went to the delaware
.s. department of education. his district includes silicon valley, the birthplace of technology. mike has dedicated his life to public service and is lauded for his work on education, civil- rights national service, immigration, transportation, the environment, and high-tech issues. >> he is also the greatest karaoke sing their -- singer and all of congress. -- in all of congress. [applause] >> he just told me i had five minutes. what do you think of this program? [applause] it is about time. i want to thank francis and fong. i think this is the very first statewide heritage month held with the mayor of san francisco. let me say something about heritage month in san francisco and your mayor. in the old days, you remember san francisco was known for passing all of these anti- chinese ordinances to limit the movement, the productivity of chinese in the city. we know two things. change happens. maybe the state of california is the state of golden opportunities, where we have a chinese-american mayor of san francisco. 35 years ago, congress members passed similar resolutions in both house and
angels and a possible new warrior stadium and technology and creatively innovate the transportation system but it's the investment and success of the neighborhoods in san francisco because that's what counts. when a neighborhood is strong a city is strong and that is a message that can't be missed and we can't lose sight of that and thank you hud for the grant and believing in our city's comprehensive approach to improve public housing and it's nice that we received two. that'sow awesome we are and i want to say thank you very much. >> well ladies and gentlemen i'm going to wrap up. i'm going to take about two minutes. i just need to thank a bunch of folks and of course mayor lee thank you for had opportunity. i know last time i did this dancing and that's not going to happen today but i am shouting and carrying on but we're not dancing. we have dr. hernandez and chairman and the commissioners and i think allen is here and the public tenant housing and gina and lots of associates and i want alex to step out for a second. we couldn't do this without speaker -- i mean leader pel
, stormwater development -- these are independent technologies. but what came first, most often, was a water supply system. the basic system is essentially the same as we used back in the 19th century. and in some cases, some of the same pipes. grusheski: philadelphia was the first american city to develop a water system and to take on as a municipal responsibility water delivery to all of its citizens. when william penn laid out the city, he actually chose a spot of land that had a lot of groundwater. however, by 1730, 30,000 people lived within the first seven blocks of philadelphia, next to the delaware river. well, 30,000 people caused filth in the city and polluted their water sources. the groundwater was not potable. and in one year, 1/6 of the population died of yellow fever. now, they didn't know at the time that yellow fever was carried by mosquitoes. but the health issue was major in that first movement to build a water system. narrator: so they set out to find the cleanest source of water. although the majority of philadelphia's water now comes from the delaware river, early engin
-packard or steve jobs. the seats we plant brings the vast forests of new products and new technologies and new patents in the future. that is where we have to -- we have to keep our eye on the main thought here. that is the discipline, the imagination, and the investment. that is what makes california -- that is why people are still coming here. they're not staying in colorado, i am sorry to say. they're right here. [applause] >> just briefly, setting aside plunder for a moment. >> i am sorry about plunder. it is a big part of wealth creation. >> could you talk briefly about your turn initiative? >> it is going well. mike rossi is leading the charge. i have met with what i think will be the next president of china. we have delegations from china to come here. we're sending delegations there. this is not just business as usual. we're getting detailed committees and proposals, a couple of the key states. we want good coming this way. we want good going out way. -- goods coming this way and we want goods going out that way. >> are you doing anything like that? >> we have been working on the north
for a long time, but something all our companies have in common is we use technology -- in our cases, an online platform -- that actually lowers the barrier -- the barrier of entry so people across the social spectrum can engage. you do not need to have a second home in a fancy condo buildings in this city. you can have an extra count that you want to rent out, and you can find access to travelers from all over the world who also do not have the resources to spend money on a $200 hotel bill who want to say on your couch, and that is really democratizing travel, not just access to travel, but also access to the tourism economy that flourishes in the city. >> i just want to address the technology point really quickly. we try and emphasize the human aspect of this, whether it is on the website or whether it is through the iphone app. other people use a device that we built, that lets you share a car more conveniently by letting the richer unlock the car with their smartphone. even with that, we really try to connect the people who are sharing because a lot of people to accept rentals ju
technology is an answer here. i am a big fan. >> [inaudible] i would love to hear from each one of you with the city could do in terms of regulation to help your businesses. we talked about the tax issue. what with each of you say is an issue the city could help with. >> i will start. one thing we would like to see is to make parking easier. we want it to be as easy to share your car as possible, and if you when your car and the renter cannot find a parking spot, that is an issue we need to solve. there are actually great models from around the world in terms of on street parking or some sort of system to not only encourage car owners to share, but also not discourage people from using private car sharing because parking is an issue. we have been piloting this a little bit, and we hope to actually see something come out around parking. obviously, the other issues we have discussed impact any of the schering economy companies. you could also see opportunities to educate the public or just gain awareness for the services through the city and existing programs. >> i forgot to repeat the q
been brought about by technology and the new fuel efficiency standards that were enacted by the bush administration and were increased by the obama administration. the report is not political in any way shape or form. it endorses things that are supported by the right in some cases and that are supported by people on the left. you cannot just take the parts that you like. you have to take the holistic approach, to maximize u.s. production and to reduce consumption partly by diversifying our transportation sector away from petroleum. the last thing i will say is that petroleum use in transportation is the pivot point of this entire problem. 70% of our use of petroleum in this country is for transportation. transportation is fueled about 93% of the time by petroleum. if you want to reduce the united states' dependence on imported petroleum and the related geopolitical issues, particularly in an issue when rising demand is creating a potential conflict for these resources, then you have to recognize transportation has to be diversified away from petroleum or the prices are set on the wo
that you go, the technology is that difference. you cannot duplicate. if you have been on the sidelines if it has a large charging base you do not need to plug this, batteries are included pop this in your suitcase when you travel i keep mine in my handbag i used to wrap my toothbrush and toilet paper. or cute. gibbons' that i have made to iceland summit. 6 c13 is fun and functional. you want to get colors and stains off of your teeth. you can use your toothbrush effectively. daughter had a problem with cartertartar but the last time we that dentist said her teeth are in better shape because of technology. you know with your teeth feel fresh and clean and polish? that is the feeling you are going to get with slim summit. >>host: and there are seven reasons to get this. --and there are so many reasons to get--that is the feeling you are going to get with slim sonic. >>host: you have three gifts under $10 each. head and you get three additional brush had spurteheads. when you need more we sell five tax-free this is a smart choice we are prescient the ortiz, and fresh breath but some
to the fore, the industry here in north america is coming greater scrutiny. this technology has been around for 30 years. it is proven to be safe, but the greater the technology the better. keep in mind natural gas well more than $100 a barrel 10 years ago. it is the old addage. high prices are the best cure for high prices. in the past 10 years we brought the technology along where we have this abundance of gas. clearly with the environmental concerns the industry will certainly solve the problem. the profit mode is just too great. melissa: let me ask you about poland. it was one of the most promising plays early on, when they went in and looked around they didn't have as much resources than they thought that is pretty unusual. i found covering this industry for years generally people underestimate what's there. so in this case they overestimated. what happened? >> well, i think right here compared to the united states, we've been punching holes in the fwroupd for the past 15, 20, 30 years. so we have a fairly good idea of the geology. this is all a geology play. so with regards to poland
the technologies here can, of course, also be used in the daily life for cars, for houses, for heating systems, cooling systems and so on. >> simon: while the technology was being fine-tuned, andre spent months inside a simulator to learn how to fly the plane himself. then, short flights to and from a military air base in switzerland. the alps provided a breathtaking backdrop, but they weren't in it for the scenery. they wanted altitude and distance. they took it out of switzerland to belgium and paris, where they created quite a stir flying by the eiffel tower. but for once, the french didn't complain, "solar impulse" was so quiet and elegant. but the biggest challenge was flying at night. were they ready? yes, said piccard, and he announced to the team that andre would be in the cockpit. >> piccard: andre will stay up there now as long as we can. >> simon: and off he went into the night. for eight hours, andre flew in darkness over switzerland. andre could see nothing, so the team on the ground had to track winds, squalls, battery levels. watching this creature in the air, long after the sun
, with water that are not always proven technologies, but they're things that are enough proven you should take a bit of a risk and you should show others it can be done. >> we're showing the world, suddenly had wind turbines which they didn't have before. so, our team realizing that time would change, and realizing where the opportunities were today, we said, you know what, we started out as really something to control wind as an asset, when you combine today's technology becomes something entirely different. >> wind turbines in an urban environment is a relatively new concept. there are a few buildings in other major cities where they have installed wind turbines on the roof. and wind turbines in buildings are effective. >> the discussion was do we do that or not? and the answer was, of course. if they're not perfect yet, they're building a building that will last 100 years. in 100 years someone is going to perfect wind efficient turbines. if these aren't right, we'll replace them. we have time to do that. >> the building that's two renewable energy generations. wind turbines located on the n
communicated with by individuals on the street using burgeoning forms of mobile technology that are available today. third, i'm very, very proud of the accessible services staff and the work they have done to implement our wheelchair pick-up both incentive program and disciplinary program using this carrot and stick approach we find that our 100 ramp taxi vehicles that are accessible to wheelchairs are much more in service now than they were when this program was beginning to be enforced at the beginning of this year. and then, finally, not the only thing we're doing but i'm trying to give you a sense of the highlights, we are implementing a color scheme performance standard system whereby if color schemes don't meet certain basic pass/fail requirements and by color schemes i mean the taxi companies, if they don't meet certain pass/fail requirements they will not be able to grow their business by attracting more medallions until such time as they do meet those pass/fail requirements and leaving the pass/fail requirements aside, using a scoring system to rank these companies based on their dis
more on cars. shoving a lot of technology into them. you could spend $30,000 on a compact car these days. lori: getting back to the storm's impact in terms of kind of cars people are buying, we saw gas lines and gas shortages was a huge part of this crisis. did more people go to hybrids? >> hard to say if sandy had anything to do with that but there is growth there. ford had increase of 75% up from small cars from last year. that tremendous growth and hybrid sales going up. lori: ford crushed it. was hybrids part of it? >> ford had a good month. chrysler was up 14%. they are seeing great growth since getting back on their feet. ford pickup sales did well as ram truck division. shows economy is getting better. a lot are sold to businesses and that sort of t expectations. gm had criticism because a lot of sales are driven by government purchases. we as taxpayers own a significant share of gm that is little questionable. >> gm premium brands saw most growth, buick, cadillac and gmc. chevrolet was kind of flat. last year at this time they had heavy incentives they didn't meet
in it. and because technology has become much more affordable, it's a much better -- you know, it's much easier for merchants to grasp and to be able to do that. so the sacramento street merchants' meeting went very well with morgan's help and gary miller has reached out. they want to host a meeting to work with merchants to get those cameras in place, too. >> thank you, that gives me a good picture and seems like they are tackling some big projects. i wanted to ask you about the significant limited english proficiency that you have with the russian community and chinese community and you are given us a sense of the language capacity at your station, there is a wide variety of languages. do you have a sense of how many officers actually speak the languages? it's actually chinese, mandarin and cantonese. >> i don't have the exact number off the top of my head, but i know that we're very well-represented in language proficiency. >> do you have any strategies reaching outstanding to the residents who are limited english proficiency? seniors who might spend a lot of time who migh
technology -- to share with car makers in china. general motors contends the the information was worth at least $40 million dollars. prosecutors for the couple argued-- the insider info was not stolen and was useless for other car companies. a bill raising new jersey's minimum wage to $8.50 an hour is before the state's general assembly today for a procedural vote before it heads to governor chris christie's desk. the bill additionally stipulates that new jersey's minimum wage be adjusted automatically, up or down, tied to the consumer price index. the bill did not pass the state assembly last week with enough support to override an anticipated gubernatorial veto. here's a good reason why you might want to check what your references are saying about you.. a new career builder study notes, 62% of employers state that when they contacted an applicant's reference, that person had nothing positive to say about the candidate. three in ten employers say they have caught a fake reference on a job application. the study surveyed hiring managers and human resource professionals across indust
of elections there. and testing ballistic missile technology that could be used to carry more nuclear weapons. 30,000 american troops are stationed there. japan is preparing for the launch as well, they are deploying service air missiles to shoot down anything that may enter its airspace. joining me now is gordon chang. you say that if this is all true, north korea has a very specific audience. who and why? >> the specific audience would be iran.e. who and why? >> the specific audience would be iran. north korea and iran have been conducting a joint missile development program for at least 15 years. in the beginning of september, they signed a technical cooperation agreement, just yesterday, the kyoto news agency reported that a facility close to the chinese border, they are there for nuclear weapons and missile purposes. we need to keep an eye on north korea's relationship with iran. jenna: not only because it is a weapon, but because it can carry a nuclear warhead -- do i have that right? can you explain it to her audience? reporter: sure. north korea has these weapons. but her rants iran i
next "right this minute." >>> and still to come,6z some cl technology inspired by those creepy cartoon portraits. >> eyes that would follow you. >> it's not just for cartoons anymore. find out how you can use your pictures to keep an eye on things. >>> and this guy's accent is the center of some classroom antics. >> did you know what it was like? >> they've been listening to him for months. four months linike that. >> now they're about to get an u but we have some good news. it's our bundle price promise. [ male announcer ] a price you can definitely count on, for two whole years. from at&t. [ female announcer ] a great price for a great triple-play bundle. [ male announcer ] call now. bundles with u-verse tv, internet and home phone start at $89 a month. now get the same great price for two years. [ female announcer ] switch today and get a total home dvr included, free for life. [ male announcer ] you get reliable, high speed internet on our advanced digital network. choose from speeds up to 24 megs. [ female announcer ] and with u-verse tv you can record four shows at once on your t
that next on "the five." ♪ ♪ why is it that the most impressive technology often comes with a set of equally impressive instructions ? shouldn't something that's truly advanced, not need much explanation at all ? with the nokia lumia 822 on verizon, there's not much to learn because it's powered by windows... to let you do more than you ever imagined on your smartphone. exclusively with data sense-- a feature that makes the most of your plan. only on verizon. ♪ ♪ >> eric: 29 days until taxes jump and spending on everything from defense, medicare and farm suddies are slashed. geithner and bane spinning away on the sunday talk circuit. i'd roll the video but we prefer you stay awake for the segment. listen to rush limbaugh shed some light. >> why would he want to go over the cliff? what happens when we go over the cliff? democrat orgasm happens. taxes go up for everybody. nirvana to these people. >> eric: i will disagree with rush. it's good for the g.o.p. to call obama's bluff. one or two results will follow us over the cliff. we go back to recession. that will hurt but the economy will r
is that they were affiliated with groups affiliated with al qaeda, like they were getting the technology and the weapons and a new type of explosive that wreaks havoc. and results in the maximum damage in terms of loss of life and in terms of destruction. by the way, i just want to say, it was a very active description. attack the shopping malls, distract the police forces and then try to target hotels and cafes where jordanians and others are enjoying their daily lives. but also to attack the entire neighborhood of the u.s. embassy, not just the u.s. embassy, lots of jordanians live in the vicinity of the embassy, with mortar shells and sophisticated weaponry. >> a lot of americans in amman at any time, but especially at the u.s. embassy in amman, a major u.s. embassy. >> and lots of jordanians. >> have you had serious conversations with your iraqi counterparts about dealing with this al qaeda growth in their country? >> of course. our intelligence sources -- you have confidence in nuri al maliki, the prime minister of iraq, that he's doing what he's done? >> he's not my responsibility
back? >> it is just the opposite. they try to be more advanced in technology. you can do more intelligent farming. also in the case of bad weather conditions. lori: what is the greatest in farming equipment? >> it has everything you would like to have. you could not go to new york and park it and do your business shopping because it goes 40 miles per hour. lori: that is not too shabby. that is actually pretty fast. 13% net profit in the third quarter. what are you forecasting for the duration of the year? >> this is a difficult question to answer. the guidance, about 10 billion topline and 520 and earnings per share. i think that is where we will be, hopefully a little better. i am pretty optimistic for 2013. lori: farming equipment is not my expertise. this is a wonderful segment. thank you very much. really wonderful to meet you this afternoon. thank you. >> thank you. lori: "the closing bell" ringing in about 40 minutes. who will replace timothy geithner? the president may have his mind made up already. charlie gasparino has the latest. stay with us. ♪ lori: quick market
technologies allow natural gas producers to supply affordable, cleaner energy, while protecting our environment. across america, these technologies protect air - by monitoring air quality and reducing emissions... ...protect water - through conservation and self-contained recycling systems... ... and protect land - by reducing our footprint and respecting wildlife. america's natural gas... domestic, abundant, clean energy to power our lives... that's smarter power today. domestic, abundant, clean energy to power our lives... music: "make someone happy" music: "make someone happy" ♪it's so important to make meone happy.♪.♪it's so e ♪make just one heart to heart you - you sing to♪ ♪one smile that cheers you ♪one face that lights when it nears you.♪ ♪and you will be happy too. 44 minutes after the top of the hour. turkey deployed pariot missiles . tell help to defend against possible attacks. customers of new jersey power company jcp&l are up in arms and they are about to be slammed with a hurricane price hike. they want to raise the monthsly bills by 1.4 percent. >> steve: a hol
to bring scientists and technology, engineers, and stands for comprehensive reform like a bigger and broader bill? i'm skeptical. >> i'm skeptical and i'm not sure we do comprehensive well. what we don't need is obamacare for administration, something on pins and needles. our government does not do comprehensive well. >> he encourage you to watch mike gonzalez if you're interested about this, and assimilation. thank you for being here. >> thank you for having me here. [applause] >> who are the frontrunners to battle it out for the white house in 2016? believe it or not, some potential candidates are already doing some planning. we're going to have an early forecast from doug schoen and peggy noonan next. [applause]. [ male announcer ] alka-seltzer plus presents the cold truth. i have a cold... i took dayquil, but i still have a runny nose. [ male announcer ] truth is, dayquil doesn't work on runny noses. what? [ male announcer ] it doesn't have an antihistamine. really? [ male announcer ] really. alka-seltzer plus cold and cough fights your worst cold symptoms, plus has a fast a
years. technology doing very well. a lot of start-up technology. innovation going well. that's a positive. manufacturing coming back a bit as well. the auto sector. however, everything can change in a nanosecond. yes, it's resilient. i agree with the secretary. however, very, very fragile. particularly with this fiscal cliff. >> well, we haven't talked about one of the big pieces of the fiscal cliff, which actually has a way bigger impact on the economy than tax breaks for the folks at the top, and that's the payroll tax extension for 160 million americans. the nonpartisan congressional budget office says that gives you the most bang for your buck economically speaking. i believe we have to extend that for a year or come up with some alternative way of doing that. let me say a quick word about medicare reform. there's a difference in outlook. we believe we have to find savings in medicare. the president did, $760 billion, and we can build on that by trying to modernize the system, reduce costs overall in the system, not simply transfer rising health care costs onto the backs
doesn't mean automatic recession, and michael gibbs says it's time to get out of technology. let's start first with mark at the cme. mark, dwi us some color from the trading floor as we hear all these fiscal talks continue. the market sells off, ends the day in the red, the dow below 13,000. where do we stand as far as what markets believe are going to happen here at the end of the year? >> well, i think what you saw today was hoo when we don't have a catalyst, these important technical levels matter. so we actually topped out right at the s&p 500's 50-day moving average, right around 1421. then that ism data came out, and we eased off that. so this morning before the market, decent catalyst, nice international economic news. then we look like we've got a shot at breaking that 50-day moving average. negative catalyst comes out, we ease right off that technical level. so i think until we see some real, some real news either on fiscal cliff or possibly nonfarms on friday, we're going to have a tough time breaking that 1421 level. on the downside, you're going to see some resistance at 1400
students with advanced degrees in science, technology, engineering, and mathematics. the republican measure drew fire from democrats, some democrats, some going so far as to level the measure racist. >> that is racist if not in its intent then certainly in its effect. republicans have received were just received historically low votes from minorities in the past election, yet they want to create an immigration system that gives vises with one hand while taking them away from minorities with the other. lou: joining as now, the co-author of numerous anti illegal immigration laws in a kansas secretary of state, also with us, the attorney, executive director of the national immigration forum. good to have you with t cards in a lottery. i'm not kidding. we were iving them away in a lottery all over the world. what this does is take those 55,000 visas and gives them away in a way that serves our national interest to peple who have advanced degrees and can help our country. in contrast, the itsy act which is a different bill that went to the senate, i think that is a disaster. basically just a reh
the newest ongoing evolving technology of the city to access the list of organizations that people can help connect up with. also, what other programs, if you're with much more resources, please go to our 311. i know nancy is here, the great leader of that organization, that talent. but also go to sf mayor.org as well to find out what other information you might want to have in order to reach out for more of the needy and help them in every way you can. i also want to say as part of this campaign that i'd like to announce that we again will be hosting snow day here at city hall. sometime in the month of december, the date hasn't been decided yet, but it will be continuing a very great tradition, not only of welcoming the tree of hope, but also asking people to bring in nonperishable items that can be donated to people in need during these holidays. and bring them here to city hall as part of a great celebration that we have that unites everyone. it will be free. it will be youth and family oriented and again, it will be supporting our food bank. with that, i know that they're going to be ha
helps to bring science and technology . engineering. >> compres hencive reform. i am skeptical. >> i am skeptical and i am not sure we do comprehensive well. we don't need obama for immigration . our government doesn't do comprehensive as well >> i encourage you to watch mike gonzalez about the issue . all of us need to do our part. thanks for being here. >> thank you for having me. >> all right. who are the front runner to battle it out for the white house in 2016. potential candidates are already doing planning. we'll have a early forecast from doug and pecky next. >> president obama is still over one month away to a gingof a second term it is never too early to talk about the next presidential election. special assistant and speech writer and journal columnist peggy newman. everybody? this is it a special day for me and i wanted to make a point. how did you get to be a press secretary. one person they wrote in on the hill. it was george. i thought the revelation . and thank you for that. am i crazy? it is not too early to talk about who is gonegoing to run. begining to the senator fr
that participated in the process of putting that together, our deputy for technology services as well, elizabeth. it really is a great opportunity to bring people closer and make it real for them how we make decisions in terms of transportation priorities. and my final item is about the [speaker not understood] bay area grant. we closed the project september 27 for [speaker not understood] the program over the next four years. on october 26, a month later we received 12 applications for a total of $62.6 million worth of projects. so, almost twice as much money as we have. and we set up a process for prioritizing those projects and those funds. it's a two-step process. in the first step we prioritize an initial list. we provide them with some money to do further development on the projects. then we bring them back a few months later so that we can evaluate how those project sponsors have refined the projects and sharpened their pencils to make them fit within the money that's available. that first phase, that first set of priorities in draft form is on your desks in the form of a matrix with very
technology could come under pressure. some of the areas which have been hit more recently such as high dividend stocks, dividend utilities are likely to benefit. i don't think the taxes will increase much on them after all. you have some areas which will get affected. i would say don't be aggressive. don't look for economic growth to pick up. be on the defensive side and you will be amply toward it. >> which is why people are sitting on their money right now. you are saying the fed is still there. you have the aftereffects of superstorm sandy, accommodative policy by the fed and you think that spurs growth in the u.s. how strong will it be? >> first thing, we have grown 2.5% in the last four quarters. and i think we will go up to 3% growth next year. i think there is some fiscal tightening but that is nothing new. we are getting rapid money growth and record-low mortgage rates, drop in gas prices, drop in the dollar, lower inflation boosting income and it's working because we are getting more parts of the economy gearing. a year ago we had no bank lending and now we have a full year of
they would take their own proceeds and reinvested back into their technology, like a business can do, and the fha is restricted. i had to go to congress and ask them to draft a bill and get legislation to allow us to raise premiums to protect our risk. that is the proposition for success over the long term. that is where the debate should be. how do we make this realization most effective, with best deals, best credit risk, so they can support the system and a little less about let's continue to pull the support out from under them? >> can you do that, because if you can, then the things you talked about are true. but if there are limits to what legislation does or does not do, and doesn't that raise questions over all these other things? a lot of the loss mitigation of the administration has been trying to encourage the private sector what they are limited to do on their own book. if you are making low downpayment loans and think principal reduction is the right way to deal with underwater borrowers, that is where i am going, is that achievable what you are talking about? >> i say w
and technologies. consumers contribute everyday. outlet malls are builds a way to shop your favorite high-end brand at a fraction of the cov. but are you really spending more than you bargained for? here is what my investigation revealed. >> i got two pairs for -- i got some of these. she cruised by the outlets in san leandro before her cruise to mexico. >> she came ready to load up, alexandra flores came here with a different mission. >> i came for dress shopping. >> reporter: what did you buy? what are these? >> nike shoes. >> reporter: how did that happen? >> i found them for a really great price, so i just bought them. >> reporter: both women are textbook outlet shoppers. says consumer psychologies, but she cautions. >> be careful, outlet shopping isn't the bargain that people think it is. >> despite what the pricetag tells you? >> it would be rare to fiend a super huge bargain at an outlet stores than five years ago. >> reporter: retailers got rid of it all at outlet stores and flash sales on the internet, but now by some estimates more than 80% of all the merchandise at a typical outl
of pretty neat engineers and, of course, much of asia turns out a lost great technology types and the rest, so they are getting bang for the education buck. your fear is it would not be copied here? >>guest: no. the trouble is, you have other countries. in finland, they focus on only putting the proper people to have the highest success in the classroom or potential for success in the classroom in education schools. so they don't just let anyone in a school education. >>neil: they look at promising students. you could be a late bloomer and get passed up. >>guest: that is possible. but, instead, what they are doing is scrutinizing people prior to getting into the system. what we do in america, unfortunately, according to international studies, we have students who are graduating to become teachers are in the bottom third of their graduating class. so we are putting people in choose rooms that are not equipped with skills. they do not have the ability to handle a classroom. so what we need to focus on is quality rather than quantity difficult. >>neil: thank you very much. you think airlines
question and answer session about the fiscal cliff. hugh says, no one makes better use of technology than our president. and mindy says, she loves the presidential seal on the cover of the laptop. i agree, mcimi. we've got more of speaker boehner's offer. first, we want to hear what you think. head over to facebook and search "politicsnation" and "like" us to join the conversation that keeps going long after the show ends. playing ] [ male announcer ] the rhythm of life. [ whistle blowing ] where do you hear that beat? campbell's healthy request soup lets you hear it... in your heart. [ basketball bouncing ] heart healthy. great taste. mmm... [ male announcer ] sounds good. it's amazing what soup can do. >>> we're back on "politicsnation" with more on speaker boehner's counteroffer to president obama. the republican house leader wants $2.2 trillion in spending cuts. and how would he do it? republicans refuse to raise taxes on the rich. unbelievable. instead, they want to slash billions from health care, raise the medicare eligibility age and hack away billions from entitlement programs. t
and science experts. it is known as the stem jobs act. science technology engineering and math. all the stuff that we need. it is unlikely that there will be passed in the democratic controlled senate. granting residency to young people brought into the country legally, some are calling this is achieved back. the gop version of the dream act. we have senator kayailey hutchison with us. senator, welcome back. >> thank you for having me. gerri: tells how your legislation is different from the dream act? >> are legislation gives the legal status to the young people who are really in a conundrum. they have grown up here. >> we do give them a legal status and we don't pretend that i'm forgetting in line if they choose to go that citizenship route. >> y have to be under 14 years old when you came here, you have to be under 28-year-olds now. you can serve fo years in the military areas or you can have six years in which to get some kind of job training or degree. a college degree or a vocational degree. something that gives you a skill. from that point, you will get a second visa that will allow you
're able to actually have technology toys in comparison to a single person who doesn't have the same amount of money than when you are in a couple. you are able to divide that pleasure. another thing, when off couple, what is one of the things that you like to do? watch movies. >> together. >> yes. >> so you need a bigger device. is that what you're saying? >> no, but it's an easier way for you to share when you're in bed, at least according to the is it studies. houms have you gone in bed to watch a movie on netflix? probably you do it quite often. if you're in a relationship you will probably be able to share the tablet but it's not the same with a smartphone. >> or you could just put it up on the tv if you have a smart tv but then that's a whole other show. i have a smartphone and a tablet. i have got them here. actually i have two smartphones and a tablet. aid blackberry and a smartphone -- is a blackberry considered a smartphone? my blackberry fell into the ocean so my company bought me an iphone. i have two iphones. what does it mean? >> it means you make a lot of money. >> no. >> yes
know you are excited, this is exciting technology. you saw how fastvideo. like we were just saying you are not waiting or getting frustrated. you know what that means?you are not getting fed up.argonaut fed up with your old computer? i was. -- are you not you want faster downloads, you want faster internet. you want faster email. if you are like our caller from florida who had visual acuity problems. i want to be able to see what i am texting.u download the application and text for free on my telephone i cannot see what is going on. if you got it because it is easier to see. forget the fact it is easier to use. not only is it going to take you to a whole new world (...) i will say you have no idea what you will be doing until you get this home. and i mean that. you are going to discover things on the amazon appstorec13 will start cooking. maybe learn a language. and did you know this will read to you? in a different language it could read a book to you to your kids. that is scratching the surface. have you heard of amazon?you can downloaded application and turn this into a 7 in. gps. y
good friend todd english. he is bringing us the green pen technology will be featuring cookie sheets cake and squared this will launch tonight at midnight please some is that it will be our very best value of the tomorrow we have more of ourfan shot coming your way to please all messed up rear guard to get all of football gets covered will be right back. [commercial] [reading] [♪ music ♪] >>host: multicolor luck are football fans shot continues here hsn, my goodness our model does not taken down. we are done i am walking off. that's great if that is one of the paris players. >>host: this is one of home team vision serve buff throat the measure 60 in. by 80 in. they get soft fur with each squash and use. wear run off for you to flex payments plus reduce shipping and handling. this is a great time to buy them for absolutely everybodydaughters, neighbors ago as as as possible throughout our teams and antthony will explain the and team spirit if you see your team that means we your team available but we do not know how long it will last because were getting to the final quantit
. technology a bright spot, thanks largely to a move in dell. >> that's right. a rare bright spot in tech today. dell shares outperforming goldman sachs, upgrading two notches from sell to buy, net cash levels provide an opportunity for leveraged buyout. take a look at research in motion. recently a lot of optimism on the street ahead of the blackberry 10 device launch early next year. today, though, canaccord downwriting it saying it doesn't show the shares. they have gained 45% over the past month. back to pu. >> seema, thank you very much. i'm thinking of brian bewith us today. he's bullish on equities all year long. he has a target price of 1425, about 15 points away, which would be a good couple of rellys fr rallies. he's even more bullish for next year. the target for the end of next year on the s&p, 1575. that would be a smooth 10% move. >> will the fiscal cliff derail market gains? how will the outcome change strategies for next year? he joins us right now. 2013 report ahead. sticking to your guns, no matter what. why? >> first of all, america. the greatest country on the planet, let's
articulate. we'll be right back. textile production in spain, and the use of medical technology in the u.s.? at t. rowe price, we understand the connections of a complex, global economy. it's just one reason over 75% of our mutual funds beat their 10-year lipper average. t. rowe price. invest with confidence. request a prospectus or summary prospectus with investment information, risks, fees and expenses to read and consider carefully before investing. you can stay in and share something... ♪ ♪ ...or you can get out there with your friends and actually share something. ♪ the lexus december to remember sales event is on, offering some of our best values of the year. this is the pursuit of perfection. offering some of our best values of the year. why they have a raise your rate cd. tonight our guest, thomas sargent. nobel laureate in economics, and one of the most cited economists in the world. professor sargent, can you tell me what cd rates will be in two years? no. if he can't, no one can. that's why ally has a raise your rate cd. ally bank. your money needs an ally. bp has paid o
science, technology, and improved economic performance and financial literacy in the 21st century. and with the ongoing support of these institutions and foundations. and... this program was made possible by the corporation for public broadcasting. and by contributions to your pbs station from viewers like you. thank you. >> ifill: house republicans today offered their counter- offer to the president's plan for a deal both sides say is needed to avoid year-end tax increases. the move was the latest volley in an increasingly tense face- off between the two branches of government. >> with 28 days left to come to a deal on the nation's fiscal cliff, the white house is holding firm on its proposal to raise taxes on the wealthy. spokesman jay carney. >> the obstacle remains at this point the refusal to acknowledge by republican leaders that there is no deal that achieves the kind of balance that is necessary without raising rates on the top 2% wealthiest americans. the math simply does not add up. >> ifill: the white house proposes raising $1.6 trillion in taxes over ten years, imposin
Search Results 0 to 49 of about 61 (some duplicates have been removed)

Terms of Use (10 Mar 2001)